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Posts Tagged ‘surgery’

Peroneal Nerve

Peroneal Nerve

There are various complications that can arise from high tibial osteotomies (HTO).  Neurologic injuries such as damage to the peroneal nerve are one of those complications.  HTO’s are often performed to relieve the pain associated with knee osteoarthritis.

The peroneal nerve lies between the biceps femoris tendon and the outside top portion of the calf muscle, and winds around the top of the fibula bone.  The peroneal nerve branches out to various other nerves in the lower leg.  Nerves are like cables that provide pathways for the electrochecmical impulses that drive the central nervous system.

Damage to the peroneal nerve can result in drop foot, making the foot drag during walking.  Also feeling can be lost in the top of the foot and front of the lower leg.



Knee Surgery

Knee Surgery

Deciding to have surgery is never easy.  You need to consult with your surgeon and discuss your medical history.

High tibial osteotomies are most successful in patients who understand exactly what they are getting into.  Patients should not be overweight, they should be active, and have a high tolerance for pain.  Also patients need to be able to take several weeks if not months off of work.

This surgery is not a treatment option for everyone who suffers from osteoarthritis of the knee.



High Tibial Osteotomy

High Tibial Osteotomy

A high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a surgical procedure often associated with osteoarthritis of the knee.

“Osteo” means bone.  “Otomy” means to cut.  So an osteotomy is a cutting of the bone.  Osteotomies are usually used to correct angulations of bones.  In the case of unicompartmental osteoarthritis, the surgery requires that a wedge of bone is removed from beneath the affected compartment.



unispacer

unispacer

This post is part of a series about the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons’ Full Treatment Guideline for Knee Osteoarthritis.

Recommendation 22 – The AAOS does not recommend using a free-floating interpositional device to treat symptomatic unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee.

The research team found evidence that suggests high re-operation rates in patients who had a free-floating interpositional devices implanted in their bodies.   Enough said.