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Posts Tagged ‘stretch’

Psoas Stretch

Chair Stretch

This stretch is to help loosen your hip flexors.  It is easy and quick.  This stretch in conjunction with others to help keep your hamstrings and quadriceps can help ease the pain associated with your osteoarthritis of the knee.

Hip Flexor Chair Stretch:

1.  Find a sturdy chair – no wheels.

2.  Place one knee on the chair.  Keep the majority of your body weight on the leg you are standing on.

3.  Slowly move your hips forward – do not rotate – until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

5.  Stretch each side five times.



Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch

Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch

A kneeling hip flexor stretch is an effective stretch for limbering up the muscles in front of your hips.  Tight hip flexors will cause undue tension on your knees.  The knee is a complicated joint and the surrounding musculature plays an important role on how the knee bends and functions.  Stretching these muscles will help your osteoarthritis of the knee.

Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch:

1.  Kneel on your right knee – use a towel as a cushion.

2.  Place your left foot forward, and bend your knee.

3.  Place your right hand on your right hip to keep your back straight.

4.  Lean forward until you feel a gentle stretch.

5.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

6.  Stretch each side five times.



Hip Flexor

Hip Flexor

The Hip Flexors are comprised of three muscles: the rectus femoris, psoas major, and the illiacus.  Hip flexors are responsible for flexing the hip and knee.  By keeping these muscles limber, you can help ease the pain of your knee OA.

Stretching, exercise, and weight loss will all help your knees feel better.  Stop taking the medications and avoid surgery.  Start thinking about conservative treatment options for your osteoarthritis of the knee.



Stretching the quadriceps is a great idea, but what if you can’t reach your ankle to pull your knee backwards?  Sometimes it’s okay to cheat.  Use an assistive device like a towel, exercise band, or even a bungee cord.

Assistive Device

Assistive Device

Stretching is a legitimate treatment option for your knee osteoarthritis.  It’s free, easy, and you can do it right now!  Consider conservative treatment options for your Knee OA.  This is one post in a series about stretching to make your knees feel better.



Stretching your quadriceps is free, and doesn’t require a prescription.  Along with your hamstrings and hip flexors, keeping these muscles limber will help ease the pain associated with you knee osteoarthritis.  Knee OA can be managed with conservative treatment options.

Prone Quadriceps Stretch

Prone Quadriceps Stretch

Prone Quadricep Stretch:

1.  Lie on your stomach.

2.  Bend your knee back and grab your ankle.

3.  Pull Until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

5.  Stretch each leg five times.



Side Lying Quadricep Stretch

Side Lying Quadricep Stretch

Stretching may be the answer if you are looking for a conservative treatment option to manage the pain of your  knee osteoarthritis.  Stretch, exercise, lose a little weight and you may not have to take as many medications.  You may even be able to avoid surgery.

This is one type of stretch for your quadriceps.  The Side Lying Quadricep Stretch:

1.  Lie on your side and support your head.

2.  Bend your top leg backward and grab your ankle.

3.  Pull until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

5.  Stretch each leg five times.



Four muscles in the front of your leg comprise the quadriceps.  This group of muscles is responsible for extending your leg and your knee.  These muscles are easy to stretch and will help ease the pain associated with your Knee OA.  This is one post in a series about stretching as a treatment option for your osteoarthritis of the knee.

Standing Quadricep Stretch

Standing Quadricep Stretch

Standing Quadricep Stretch:

1.  Stand and hold onto something sturdy for balance.

2.  Bend your knee backwards and grab your ankle.

3.  Pull your knee back until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

5.  Stretch both legs five times each.



Stretching will increase your flexibility.  If the muscles surrounding your knee are flexible it will help ease the pain associated with your osteoarthritis.  Keep your hamstrings limber and manage your knee OA.  This is one post in a series about stretching as a conservative treatment option.

Stand and Lean on a Step

Stand and Lean on a Step

Hamstring Stretch – Stand and Lean (this is my favorite hamstring stretch)

1.  Stand and straighten your leg.

2.  Place your heel on a step, rail, or bench.

3.  Hold onto a wall of bar for support.

4.  Slightly bend your other leg.

5.  Lean forward until you feel a gentle stretch.

6.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

7.  Switch legs.

8.  Stretch each leg five times.



This is a series about stretching to treat knee osteoarthritis.  The hamstrings play an important role in how your knee bends and straightens.  If you want to manage the pain associated with your Knee OA, then make sure your hamstrings are flexible.

Stand and Lean

Stand and Lean

Stand and Lean Hamstring Stretch:

1.  Stand up straight with your left foot about six inches in front of your right foot.

2.  Lift your left toes.

3.  Slightly bend your right knee.

4.  Lean forward from your hips, and rest both palms on your left leg for balance and support.



Keeping your hamstrings flexible will help both your back and knees feel better.  A wall stretch is a great way to stretch the back of your legs and manage your lumbar and osteoarthritis pain.  Stretching should be part of your treatment program for your knee OA.

Seated Wall Stretch

Seated Wall Stretch

Seated Hamstring Wall Stretch:

1.  Find a wall with a corner.

2.  Lie on your back with your butt up against the wall.

3.  Straighten one leg, and place your heel against the wall.

4.  Push the back of your leg towards the wall until you feel a gentle stretch.

5.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

6.  Switch legs.

7.  Stretch each leg five times.