Support and Brace Support and Brace

Calendar

November 2017
M T W T F S S
« Oct    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Posts Tagged ‘quadricep’

Quadriceps_Osteoarthritis

Quadriceps

The quadriceps is a large group of muscles located on the front of the thigh.  They are responsible for extending the leg and they’re strongest muscles in the body.

The quadriceps is divided into four sections.  All four parts attach to the knee cap through the patella tendon.

Rectus Femoris – Located in the middle of the thigh, this section of the quadriceps covers most of the other three sections of muscle (listed below).  Along with knee extension, this muscle also helps flex the hip.  It is attached to the ilium, or the top of the hip.

Vastus Lateralis – Located under the rectus femoris, this section of the quadriceps is attached to the femur and lies on the outside (lateral side) of the thigh.

Vastus Medialis – Located under the rectus femoris, this section of the quadriceps is attached to the femur and lies on the inside (medial side) of the thigh.

Vastus Intermedius – Located under the rectus femoris, this section of the quadriceps is attached to the femur and lies between the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis.

Since all four sections of the quadriceps attach themselves to the knee cap, these muscles play an important role in how the knee slides and glides.  Injury of weakness can lead to or affect osteoarthritis of the knee.



Stretching the quadriceps is a great idea, but what if you can’t reach your ankle to pull your knee backwards?  Sometimes it’s okay to cheat.  Use an assistive device like a towel, exercise band, or even a bungee cord.

Assistive Device

Assistive Device

Stretching is a legitimate treatment option for your knee osteoarthritis.  It’s free, easy, and you can do it right now!  Consider conservative treatment options for your Knee OA.  This is one post in a series about stretching to make your knees feel better.



Stretching your quadriceps is free, and doesn’t require a prescription.  Along with your hamstrings and hip flexors, keeping these muscles limber will help ease the pain associated with you knee osteoarthritis.  Knee OA can be managed with conservative treatment options.

Prone Quadriceps Stretch

Prone Quadriceps Stretch

Prone Quadricep Stretch:

1.  Lie on your stomach.

2.  Bend your knee back and grab your ankle.

3.  Pull Until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

5.  Stretch each leg five times.



Side Lying Quadricep Stretch

Side Lying Quadricep Stretch

Stretching may be the answer if you are looking for a conservative treatment option to manage the pain of your  knee osteoarthritis.  Stretch, exercise, lose a little weight and you may not have to take as many medications.  You may even be able to avoid surgery.

This is one type of stretch for your quadriceps.  The Side Lying Quadricep Stretch:

1.  Lie on your side and support your head.

2.  Bend your top leg backward and grab your ankle.

3.  Pull until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

5.  Stretch each leg five times.



Four muscles in the front of your leg comprise the quadriceps.  This group of muscles is responsible for extending your leg and your knee.  These muscles are easy to stretch and will help ease the pain associated with your Knee OA.  This is one post in a series about stretching as a treatment option for your osteoarthritis of the knee.

Standing Quadricep Stretch

Standing Quadricep Stretch

Standing Quadricep Stretch:

1.  Stand and hold onto something sturdy for balance.

2.  Bend your knee backwards and grab your ankle.

3.  Pull your knee back until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

5.  Stretch both legs five times each.



Stretching

Stretching

Stretching is important if you want your knees to feel better.  It doesn’t cost anything, you don’t need a prescription, and you can do it right now!

The muscles surrounding your knees play a role in how your knees move and feel.  This series of blog posts will explain several stretches to help ease the pain associated with your knee osteoarthritis.  In particular we will examine stretches for the hamstrings, quadriceps, and hip flexors.