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Posts Tagged ‘magnet therapy’

magnetic knee braces

Double-blind placebo-controlled trial of static magnets for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: results of a pilot study.

Wolsko PM, Eisenberg DM, Simon LS, Davis RB, Walleczek J, Mayo-Smith M, Kaptchuk TJ, Phillips RS. Division for Research and Education, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

CONTEXT: Outpatient clinical studies of magnet therapy, a complementary therapy commonly used to treat osteoarthritis (OA), have been limited by the absence of a credible placebo control.

OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess the feasibility and promise of studying static magnetic therapy for knee OA and determine the ability of a new placebo-magnet device to provide concealment of group assignment.

DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

SETTING: Academic teaching hospital in Boston. PARTICIPANTS: We enrolled 29 subjects with idiopathic or post-traumatic OA of the knee.

INTERVENTIONS: Subjects received either high-strength magnetic (active) or placebo-magnetic (placebo) knee sleeve treatment for 4 hours in a monitored setting and self-treatment 6 hours daily for 6 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Primary outcomes were change in knee pain as measured by the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index Pain Subscale at 6 weeks and extent of group concealment at study end.

RESULTS: At 4 hours, VAS pain scores (+/- SE) on a 5-item scale (0-500, 500 worst) decreased 79 +/- 18 mm in the active group and 10 +/- 21 mm in the placebo group (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in any primary or secondary measure of efficacy between the treatment groups at 6 weeks. Despite widespread testing for magnetic properties, at study end, 69% of the active group and 77% of the placebo group (P > 0.2) believed that they had been assigned to the active treatment group.

CONCLUSION: Despite our small sample size, magnets showed statistically significant efficacy compared to placebo after 4 hours under rigorously controlled conditions. The sustained efficacy of magnetic therapy for knee osteoarthritis could be assessed in an adequately powered trial utilizing an appropriate control such our new placebo-magnet device.

Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):36-43. PMID: 15055092

Learn more about magnetic knee supports.



magnetic-therapy

 

Magnetic therapy has been used worldwide for centuries and is ideal for pain relief. Back pain, knee pain, arthritis, tendonitis, or even migraines can be helped with magnets.  Magnets are a safe, easy and effective method for achieving natural pain relief. In most cases, magnets are placed directly over the painful area.

Magnets can affect ion channels which can reduce and/or block nerve pain signals. Ions are electro-chemicals that have either a positive or negative charge. Their movement through cellular gateways, called ‘ion channels’, controls pain signals, muscle contraction, and nearly all other biological processes. Ion channels can be affected chemically with drugs, manually with electrical stimulation, and naturally with magnets.

Using magnets for pain relief offers a huge advantage, because they’re safe, non-invasive, they last a long time, and have no side effects. Research studies show that magnetic therapy can be used as often as needed.  When high quality magnets are properly applied, they can be effective up to 90% of the time.

Learn more about magnetic knee braces.

Learn more about magnetic back braces.



magnetic therapy

                  Magnetic Therapy

There are many skeptics of magnetic therapy. But magnet therapy has a growing number of people who swear that it works, and rely on it to live pain free lives.

Using magnets for pain relief has been around for a long time. Aristotle, the Greek philosopher talked about the healing property of magnets in 300 BC.  And the earliest recorded mention of the medical use of magnets was about 2000 BC.  The Yellow Emperor`s Classic of Internal Medicine is one of the earliest medical books ever written. The book discusses using magnets for pain relief as well as other modern treatment options.

It was discovered in the late 1700s that the body produces magnetic impulses. Many studies around this time led to the belief that placing magnets on an affected area of the body will help align these impulses and ease pain.

Learn more about magnetic knee braces.



 

How will magnetic therapy help reduce the knee pain associated with osteoarthritis?

Nerves generate electrical signals – this is well known.  Sodium and potassium constitute positive ions while chloride and calcium make up negative ions.  The nerves help keep a healthy balance of negative and positive ions so that there is a slightly negative charge.  When this balance of ions shift and the nerve becomes more positive than negative pain signals are sent to the brain.  A strong negative magnetic charge can reduce these pain signals.  The magnet must be strong and it must be placed with the negative side down.

 



 

Studies show that the human body functions through chemical reactions and electro-magnetic interactions. Electro-chimical ions comprise the majority of the chemicals within our bodies.  These ions have negative or positive charges, and react to electro-magnetic fields.

Biological processes can be effected by the contact, equilibrium, and movement of ions.   The channels the ions move within can affect bodily functions, like sleep and circulation.  Pharmaceuticals, electric stimulation, and magnetic therapy can all affect ions and ion channels.