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Posts Tagged ‘knee OA’

Most people who think they eat a well-balanced and healthy diet probably aren’t aware that it’s almost impossible to get all the nutrients and minerals that our bodies need from eating balanced meals. In fact, in order to obtain the minimum amount of necessary nutrition people would have to consume far more calories than is healthy. As a result, dietary supplements have become more and more popular among people of all ages and from all walks of life. When you augment your nutritional regimen with vital supplements you’re giving your body the energy and nutrients it needs to combat the negative effects of aging.

For anyone living with knee OA the proper supplementation can make a world of difference. Osteoarthritis supplements have been proven effective in helping to manage pain and promote joint health. By treating causes rather than symptoms you can experience pain relief and a higher quality of life. And the best part is, they’re affordable. You can lead a life with less pain without breaking the bank.



Stretching the quadriceps is a great idea, but what if you can’t reach your ankle to pull your knee backwards?  Sometimes it’s okay to cheat.  Use an assistive device like a towel, exercise band, or even a bungee cord.

Assistive Device

Assistive Device

Stretching is a legitimate treatment option for your knee osteoarthritis.  It’s free, easy, and you can do it right now!  Consider conservative treatment options for your Knee OA.  This is one post in a series about stretching to make your knees feel better.



Four muscles in the front of your leg comprise the quadriceps.  This group of muscles is responsible for extending your leg and your knee.  These muscles are easy to stretch and will help ease the pain associated with your Knee OA.  This is one post in a series about stretching as a treatment option for your osteoarthritis of the knee.

Standing Quadricep Stretch

Standing Quadricep Stretch

Standing Quadricep Stretch:

1.  Stand and hold onto something sturdy for balance.

2.  Bend your knee backwards and grab your ankle.

3.  Pull your knee back until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

5.  Stretch both legs five times each.



Stretching will increase your flexibility.  If the muscles surrounding your knee are flexible it will help ease the pain associated with your osteoarthritis.  Keep your hamstrings limber and manage your knee OA.  This is one post in a series about stretching as a conservative treatment option.

Stand and Lean on a Step

Stand and Lean on a Step

Hamstring Stretch – Stand and Lean (this is my favorite hamstring stretch)

1.  Stand and straighten your leg.

2.  Place your heel on a step, rail, or bench.

3.  Hold onto a wall of bar for support.

4.  Slightly bend your other leg.

5.  Lean forward until you feel a gentle stretch.

6.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

7.  Switch legs.

8.  Stretch each leg five times.



This is a series about stretching to treat knee osteoarthritis.  The hamstrings play an important role in how your knee bends and straightens.  If you want to manage the pain associated with your Knee OA, then make sure your hamstrings are flexible.

Stand and Lean

Stand and Lean

Stand and Lean Hamstring Stretch:

1.  Stand up straight with your left foot about six inches in front of your right foot.

2.  Lift your left toes.

3.  Slightly bend your right knee.

4.  Lean forward from your hips, and rest both palms on your left leg for balance and support.



Keeping your hamstrings flexible will help both your back and knees feel better.  A wall stretch is a great way to stretch the back of your legs and manage your lumbar and osteoarthritis pain.  Stretching should be part of your treatment program for your knee OA.

Seated Wall Stretch

Seated Wall Stretch

Seated Hamstring Wall Stretch:

1.  Find a wall with a corner.

2.  Lie on your back with your butt up against the wall.

3.  Straighten one leg, and place your heel against the wall.

4.  Push the back of your leg towards the wall until you feel a gentle stretch.

5.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

6.  Switch legs.

7.  Stretch each leg five times.



A safe and effective way to stretch the hamstrings is with a standing wall hamstring stretch.  If you suffer from back pain as well as knee osteoarthritis, this stretch can help loosen your hamstrings and spare your back.  This is one article in a series about stretching to conservatively treat knee OA.

Standing Wall Stretch

Standing Wall Stretch

Standing Wall Hamstring Stretch:

1.  Place your hands on a wall – shoulder height, shoulder width apart.

2.  Step back with one leg and push against the wall.

3.  Press your heels into the floor while keeping your back straight – until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

5.  Repeat with the other leg.

6.  Stretch each leg five times.



Knee Arthroscopy

Knee Arthroscopy

This post is one of a series of posts about the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons’ (AAOS) Knee Osteoarthritis TreatmentGuideline.

Recommendation 18 – The AAOS does not recommend arthroscopic debridement and lavage in patients with knee oa.

Since the North American Arthroscopy Association helped fund the AAOS Treatment Guideline, this recommendation is a big deal.  This is orthopedic surgeons telling other orthopedic surgeons that one of their bread-and-butter surgeries doesn’t work.

The research team concluded that arthroscopic debridement has no significant benefit for knee osteoarthritis.  Wow.




This is a continuation of our series on the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis published in the Journal of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage.

knee surgery

arthroscopic knee surgery

Recommendation XXIV

Arthroscopic debridement and lavage for knee osteoarthritis is controversial.

3 out of 3 treatment guidelines recommend arthroscopic debridement and lavage as a treatment option for knee OA but some studies have demonstrated symptomatic pain relief can be attributed to a placebo effect.  Controversy regarding the efficacy and indications for this treatment option continues.

The research team gave this osteoarthritis treatment option a Strength of Recommendation score of 60%.

W. Zhang Ph.D., Moskowitz M.D., et al. OARSI recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis, Part II: OARSI evidence-based, expert consensus guidelines. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. (2008) 16, 137-162


This is a continuation of our series on the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis published in the Journal of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage.

glucosamine and chondrotin

Recommendation XIX

In patients with symptomatic knee OA glucosamine sulphate and chondrotin sulphate may have structure-modifying effects.

Two randomized controlled trials involving 414 patients reported evidence that 1500mg of glucosamine sulphate taken on a daily basis may have structure-modifying effects in patients with knee OA.  This means cartilage may be rebuilt.

The research team gave this osteoarthritis treatment option a Strength of Recommendation score of 41%.

W. Zhang Ph.D., Moskowitz M.D., et al. OARSI recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis, Part II: OARSI evidence-based, expert consensus guidelines. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. (2008) 16, 137-162.