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Posts Tagged ‘hamstring’

Hamstrings

Hamstrings

Hamstrings refer to the muscles located on the back of your thigh.  These four muscles are responsible for flexing the knee, and three of the four help extend the hip.  The hamstrings are comprised of the:

Semitendinosus: is located on the back of the thigh, on the inside of the body (medial aspect).  This muscles helps straighten the hip and bend the knee.  It also assists rotating the knee inward (medially).

Semimembranosus – is located on the back of the thigh, on the very inside of the leg.  This muscle helps straighten the hip and bend the knee.

Biceps Femoris – is located on the back of the thigh, and has two parts:

  1. Long Head – attaches from the hip to the fibula and tibia.  It is responsible for extending the hip and bending the knee.  It also helps rotate the leg.
  2. Short Head – attaches from the femur to the fibula and tibia.  It is responsible for bending the knee and rotating the leg.

Keeping the hamstrings flexible is important if you have osteoarthritis.  Tight hamstrings will affect how your knee bends and straightens.



Stretching will increase your flexibility.  If the muscles surrounding your knee are flexible it will help ease the pain associated with your osteoarthritis.  Keep your hamstrings limber and manage your knee OA.  This is one post in a series about stretching as a conservative treatment option.

Stand and Lean on a Step

Stand and Lean on a Step

Hamstring Stretch – Stand and Lean (this is my favorite hamstring stretch)

1.  Stand and straighten your leg.

2.  Place your heel on a step, rail, or bench.

3.  Hold onto a wall of bar for support.

4.  Slightly bend your other leg.

5.  Lean forward until you feel a gentle stretch.

6.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

7.  Switch legs.

8.  Stretch each leg five times.



This is a series about stretching to treat knee osteoarthritis.  The hamstrings play an important role in how your knee bends and straightens.  If you want to manage the pain associated with your Knee OA, then make sure your hamstrings are flexible.

Stand and Lean

Stand and Lean

Stand and Lean Hamstring Stretch:

1.  Stand up straight with your left foot about six inches in front of your right foot.

2.  Lift your left toes.

3.  Slightly bend your right knee.

4.  Lean forward from your hips, and rest both palms on your left leg for balance and support.



Keeping your hamstrings flexible will help both your back and knees feel better.  A wall stretch is a great way to stretch the back of your legs and manage your lumbar and osteoarthritis pain.  Stretching should be part of your treatment program for your knee OA.

Seated Wall Stretch

Seated Wall Stretch

Seated Hamstring Wall Stretch:

1.  Find a wall with a corner.

2.  Lie on your back with your butt up against the wall.

3.  Straighten one leg, and place your heel against the wall.

4.  Push the back of your leg towards the wall until you feel a gentle stretch.

5.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

6.  Switch legs.

7.  Stretch each leg five times.



A safe and effective way to stretch the hamstrings is with a standing wall hamstring stretch.  If you suffer from back pain as well as knee osteoarthritis, this stretch can help loosen your hamstrings and spare your back.  This is one article in a series about stretching to conservatively treat knee OA.

Standing Wall Stretch

Standing Wall Stretch

Standing Wall Hamstring Stretch:

1.  Place your hands on a wall – shoulder height, shoulder width apart.

2.  Step back with one leg and push against the wall.

3.  Press your heels into the floor while keeping your back straight – until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

5.  Repeat with the other leg.

6.  Stretch each leg five times.



Three individual muscles makes up the hamstrings:  the biceps femoris, seimetendinosus, and semimembranosus.  Keeping the hamstrings flexible is a great conservative treatment option for your knee osteoarthritis.  Think about it, if you can ease your pain by stretching, no co-pays, no trips to the pharmacy, no side effects from drugs, no surgery…

This is one article in a series of blog posts describing different stretches to help your knees.

Standing Cross Leg Hamstring Stretch

Standing Cross Leg Hamstring Stretch

Standing Cross Leg Hamstring Stretch

1.  Stand, and cross your legs

2.  Slowly bend at the waist, keeping your knees straight

3.  Once you feel a gentle stretch, hold the position for ten seconds

4.  Stand up

5.  Repeat five times.



Standing Hamstring Stretch

Standing Hamstring Stretch

Stretching the hamstrings is easy and doesn’t take much time.  It is also important if you want to treat your knee osteoarthritis conservatively.  Medications and surgery can be dangerous.  Try this – a standing hamstring stretch:

1.  Stand up

2.  Bend forward, keeping your knees straight –  until you feel a gentle stretch

3.  Hold the position for ten seconds

4.  Return to the position you started in

5.  Repeat five times

This post is part of a series about how stretching can play an important role in a conservative treatment plan for knee osteoarthritis.



Living a more limber lifestyle can help ease the pain of the osteoarthritis in your knees.  Stretching can be an effective, conservative treatment option.

Here is another seated stretch:

Seated Hamstring Stretch

Seated Hamstring Stretch

1.  Sit down, straighten one leg

2.  Bend the other leg so that the sole of your foot is against your inner thigh

3.  Bend at the waist and reach forward until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.  Hold the stretch for ten seconds

5.  Relax the stretch

6.  Repeat five times.



Seated Hamstring Stretch

Seated Hamstring Stretch

Your hamstrings are located on the back of your leg behind your thigh.  It is a large muscle group that helps bend the knee and extend the hip.  Tight hamstrings are common in people that spend a lot of time sitting.  Effective hamstring stretching should be part of the treatment program for your knee osteoarthritis.

The seated hamstring stretch is simple:

1.  Sit on the floor

2.  Put your legs straight out in front of you.

3.  Lean forward, keeping your knees straight – until you feel a gentle stretch.

4.   Hold the stretch for ten seconds.

5.  Return to where you started.

6.  Repeat five times.



Stretching

Stretching

Stretching is important if you want your knees to feel better.  It doesn’t cost anything, you don’t need a prescription, and you can do it right now!

The muscles surrounding your knees play a role in how your knees move and feel.  This series of blog posts will explain several stretches to help ease the pain associated with your knee osteoarthritis.  In particular we will examine stretches for the hamstrings, quadriceps, and hip flexors.