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Posts Tagged ‘cartilage’

knee meniscus

knee meniscus

The menisci of the knee joint is a crescent-shaped cartilage structure that disperses friction in the knee joint.  The knee menisci is flat on the bottom and concave on the top.  The menisci of the knee is divided into two parts: medial (inside) and lateral (outside).  Both sides of the menisci provide structural strength to the knee when tension and torsion are applied to it.

When the meniscus is injured doctors either repair it or remove part of it.  It depends on where the tear is located, the age of the patient, and the skill of the doctor.  Either a repair or removal of the meniscus can lead to osteoarthritis.



Knee Cartilage

Knee Cartilage

Cartilage is a slippery cushion-like tissue between your bones. It serves as a smooth, resilient cushion that allows your knee joint to move freely.

There are two types of joint cartilage in your knees: fibrous and hyaline.

1.  Fibrous cartilage comprises the menisci, two pads of cartilage that disperse friction in between the lower leg and thigh. Acting like shock absorbers, it has tensile strength and can resist pressure.

2.  Hyaline cartilage covers the bony surfaces that joints move along. Flexible and strong, its smooth surface is slippery. This allows the knee joint to move easily. Hyaline cartilage will wear over the years, and has a limited capacity for self-restoration.

Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage in your knee erodes.



This is a continuation of our series on the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis published in the Journal of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage.

OARSI - OA Education

OARSI - OA Education

Recommendation II

All patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis should be educated about their condition.

The focus of education for patients with knee osteoarthritis should be self-help and patient-driven treatments rather than relying on medical professionals.  The importance of lifestyle choices such as weight loss, diet, and exercise need to be stressed.  Also an emphasis on reducing the amount of drugs a patient takes is important.

This recommendation is based on expert opinion, common sense, and economic consideration.  The research team gave this osteoarthritis treatment option a Strength of Recommendation score of 97%.

W. Zhang Ph.D., Moskowitz M.D., et al. OARSI recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis, Part II: OARSI evidence-based, expert consensus guidelines. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. (2008) 16, 137-162.


 

Osteoarthritis Research Society International

Osteoarthritis Research Society International

Recommendation I

Knee Osteoarthritis is best managed with a combination of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments.

There was 100% agreement among the physicians comprising the research team that a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological osteoarthritis treatments options provided optimal management for knee and hip osteoarthritis.

For example: weight loss, exercise, and NSAIDs.

This recommendation is based mostly on expert opinion and lacks evidence from randomized controlled trials.  The research team gave this treatment option a Strength of Recommendation score of 96%.

W. Zhang Ph.D., Moskowitz M.D., et al. OARSI recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis, Part II: OARSI evidence-based, expert consensus guidelines. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. (2008) 16, 137-162.


Knee Cartilage

Cartilage is a cushion beween your bones.  It is slippery and designed to make your joints move easily.  The human knee has two types of cartilage: fibrous and hyaline.  The meniscus is made of fibrous cartilage and acts like a shock absorber.  Hyaline cartilage is strong and slippery  – it covers the bony surfaces.

Osteoarthritis effects both hyaline and fibrous cartilage.  It is a natural part of aging and occurs when the cartilage wears out.



In London physicians discovered a way to grow new cartilage in patients with osteoarthritis.

Healthy cells are harvested from the knee, and then sent to Germany to be re-grown in a petri dish with growth enhancers.

A thin layer of cartilage made from the patients’ cells and DNA is then placed back into the knee.

More to follow as information becomes available…..