Support and Brace Support and Brace

Calendar

December 2017
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Anatomy of Knee Arthritis – The Tendons

April 11, 2011
Knee Tendons

Knee Tendons

Tendons usually connect bones to muscles.  Tendons, also called sinew, are tough bands of connective tissue made from collagen.  The Patellar tendon is about 10cm in length and is flat and strong.  It connects the Quadriceps muscle to the tibia, and passes along either side of the patella.  It is divided into two distinct sections:

Patella Tendon: Connects to the front of the tibia at a place called the tibial tubercle, to the bottom of the patella.  Since this connective tissue is attached to two different bones, it is actually a ligament.
Quadriceps Tendon:  Connects the quadriceps femoris (thigh muscle) to the top of the patella.  Tears of the patellar tendon are more common in middle-aged people.  Falls, jumping and chronic diseases that disrupt blood supply can all weaken the patellar tendon.  Injuries do not always result in complete tears, many times some of the fibers become frayed, like a worn or damaged rope.
The patellar tendon is responsible for how your knee bends and straightens.  If it is injured, long-term wear-and-tear can affect how your knee slides and glides.  This can damage the cartilage in your knee, resulting in osteoarthritis.


One Response to “Anatomy of Knee Arthritis – The Tendons”

  1. steve jonnah says:

    I like this web site so much, saved to fav.

Leave a Reply