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We were asked to post some studies about magnetic therapy

 patient education

 Effects of static magnets on chronic knee pain and physical function: a double-blind study.

Hinman MR, Ford J, Heyl H.

Department of Physical Therapy, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, USA.

CONTEXT: Static magnets have become an increasingly popular alternative therapy for individuals with musculoskeletal pain despite limited scientific evidence to support their efficacy or safety.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of static magnets on the pain and functional limitations associated with chronic knee pain due to degenerative joint disease.

DESIGN: Double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

SETTING: Pretests and posttests were conducted in an academic health science center.

PARTICIPANTS: Forty-three ambulatory subjects with chronic pain in 1 or both knee joints who were recruited from outpatient clinics or who volunteered to participate.

INTERVENTION: Subjects wore pads containing magnets or placebos over their painful knee joints for 2 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-administered ratings of pain and physical function using the Western Ontario and Mc Master Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and a timed 15-m (50-ft) walk.

RESULTS: Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed significantly greater improvements in the group wearing magnets (P=.002). Univariate analyses indicated that comparative changes in self-rated pain and physical function (P=.002 and .001, respectively) were greater than changes in gait speed (P=.042).

CONCLUSIONS: The application of static magnets over painful knee joints appears to reduce pain and enhance functional movement. However, further study is needed to determine the physiological mechanisms responsible for this analgesic effect.

Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. 2002 Jul-Aug;8(4):50-5.

Information about magnetic therapy knee brace.



We were asked to post some studies about magnetic therapy

Joint Pain

Joint Pain

Effect of magnetic knee wrap on quadriceps strength in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

Chen CY, Chen CL, Hsu SC, Chou SW, Wang KC. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of magnetic knee wrap on isokinetic quadriceps strength in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis (OA).

DESIGN: Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled and before-after trial.

SETTING: Rehabilitation clinic in a tertiary hospital.

PARTICIPANTS: Eligible patients (N=50) (mean age+/-SD, 66.0+/-8.6 y) with mild to moderate knee OA were recruited from the outpatient department and 37 (74%) completed the trial. Only 3 (6%) withdrew due to study-related adverse effects.

INTERVENTIONS: Wearing the active (n=24) or sham (n=26) magnetic knee wrap for 12 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was isokinetic quadriceps strength. Secondary outcome measures included the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) Pain Scale.

RESULTS: Using intention-to-treat analyses, the peak isokinetic quadriceps strength increased significantly in the treated leg at 30 degrees/s (P=.007) and 60 degrees/s (P=.022) after wearing the magnetic knee wrap. Compared with baseline, the median strength increase for the treated leg in the study group significantly exceeded that in the control group at week 4 (.05 Nm/kg vs -.09 Nm/kg at 60 degrees/s, P=.038) and week 12 (30 degrees/s, .09 Nm/kg vs .04 Nm/kg, P=.044; 60 degrees/s, .17 Nm/kg vs .02 Nm/kg, P=.031). The HAQ-DI and HAQ Pain Scales improved significantly in both groups. Compared with baseline, the improvement at week 12 in terms of the HAQ-DI in the study group significantly exceeded that in the control group.

CONCLUSIONS: Magnetic knee wrap may significantly facilitate isokinetic quadriceps strength in patients with mild to moderate knee OA (osteoarthritis).

Chen CY, Chen CL, Hsu SC, Chou SW, Wang KC (Dec 2008). “Effect of magnetic knee wrap on quadriceps strength in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 89(12):2258-64. PMID: 18976982

Information about magnetic therapy knee brace.



We were asked to post some studies about magnetic therapyHere you go.

magnetic therapy

magnetic therapy

Double-blind placebo-controlled trial of static magnets for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: results of a pilot study.

Wolsko PM, Eisenberg DM, Simon LS, Davis RB, Walleczek J, Mayo-Smith M, Kaptchuk TJ, Phillips RS. Division for Research and Education, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

CONTEXT: Outpatient clinical studies of magnet therapy, a complementary therapy commonly used to treat osteoarthritis (OA), have been limited by the absence of a credible placebo control.

OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess the feasibility and promise of studying static magnetic therapy for knee OA and determine the ability of a new placebo-magnet device to provide concealment of group assignment.

DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

SETTING: Academic teaching hospital in Boston. PARTICIPANTS: We enrolled 29 subjects with idiopathic or post-traumatic OA of the knee.

INTERVENTIONS: Subjects received either high-strength magnetic (active) or placebo-magnetic (placebo) knee sleeve treatment for 4 hours in a monitored setting and self-treatment 6 hours daily for 6 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Primary outcomes were change in knee pain as measured by the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index Pain Subscale at 6 weeks and extent of group concealment at study end.

RESULTS: At 4 hours, VAS pain scores (+/- SE) on a 5-item scale (0-500, 500 worst) decreased 79 +/- 18 mm in the active group and 10 +/- 21 mm in the placebo group (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in any primary or secondary measure of efficacy between the treatment groups at 6 weeks. Despite widespread testing for magnetic properties, at study end, 69% of the active group and 77% of the placebo group (P > 0.2) believed that they had been assigned to the active treatment group.

CONCLUSION: Despite our small sample size, magnets showed statistically significant efficacy compared to placebo after 4 hours under rigorously controlled conditions. The sustained efficacy of magnetic therapy for knee osteoarthritis could be assessed in an adequately powered trial utilizing an appropriate control such our new placebo-magnet device.

Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):36-43. PMID: 15055092

Information about magnetic therapy knee brace.