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Archive for April 9th, 2011

Ligaments of the Knee

Ligaments of the Knee

A ligament is a band of fibrous tissue that connects bones to other bones.  There are four ligaments holding your knee together:

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL):  This band of fibrous tissue connects the tibia to the femur.  It is responsible for keeping the femur from sliding too far backwards (posterior).

Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL):   This ligament also connects the tibia to the femur.  It is responsible for keeping the femur from sliding too far forwards (anterior).

Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL): This ligament connects the tibia to the femur on the inside (medial side)  of your knee.  It is responsible for keeping your knee from rotating too far outward (abduction).

Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL):  This ligament connects the tibia to the femur on the outside (lateral side) of your knee.  It is responsible for keeping your knee from rotating too far inward (adduction).

If anyone of these ligaments becomes injured it can affect how your knee moves.  Over time the resulting tracking problems could lead to osteoarthritis.  The knee is a complicated joint.  Even the slightest change in how it slides and glides can cause problems.