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Archive for the ‘Arthritis Knee Braces’ Category

New Unloader Knee Brace

There’s a new version of an effective and reliable knee brace to treat unicompartmental osteoarthritis.  The New Options Sports Wrap-Around OA Knee Brace is now available.

This off-loading knee brace is indicated for mild to moderate levels of knee pain caused by OA.  This knee brace comes in a wrap-around design, meaning patients do not have to struggle pulling the knee brace up or down their legs.  The knee brace simply wraps around and fastens with Velcro closures.  The patella buttress is designed to address secondary patella tracking issues.

This is a low-profile knee brace with thigh and calf paddles to offer some mild unloading of the knee joint.   The paddles work in conjunction with “lock down” straps that provide counter force.

The pull-up version of this unloading knee brace has been used effectively for years.  The wrap-around version makes it easier for patients to use and wear.  If you are considering a knee brace to treat your knee pain associated with arthritis, this brace is worth learning about.

Learn more about the New Option OA Knee Brace



Global Knee Brace

November 1, 2015

Global Knee

Global Knee

Hely & Weber just released a new knee brace for bi and tri-compartmental osteoarthritis.  There is often a significant amount of time that passes between when a patient is told they need have their knee replaced and when the surgery actually takes place.  This knee brace is designed to help patients during the delay.

There are several reasons for the delay.  Sometimes there are necessary medical needs that must be addressed, or a patient may need to lose weight.  Sometimes patients just aren’t ready for the surgery, whether it be logistical or emotional readiness.  And many times its conservative care guidelines dictated by health insurance providers.

The struts on this knee brace can apply a varus or valgus force when molded with bending irons as well as accommodate a bulbous or knee deformed by arthritis.

Global Knee II



Swimming Helps OA

Swimming Helps Knee OA

 

The more overweight you are, the more your knees will hurt.  You can try and mask the pain with drugs like NSAIDs and steroids, but at the end of the day your cartilage still takes an undue pounding every time you take a step.  You only have so much cartilage in your knee.  The more overweight you are, the more you compress the cartilage in your knee whenever you take a step.  Think about how your knees support your entire body weight as you walk.  If you are carrying extra pounds the best way to treat your chronic knee pain from OA is to shed some weight.

Losing weight isn’t easy but it is possible.  It’s not possible for you to spontaneously grow new cartilage.  A knee brace for osteoarthritis can be very effective for people trying to lose weight.  A common complaint among people who suffer from knee OA is that they can’t exercise because their knees hurt, so they cant lose weight.  An unloading knee brace can help treat the pain associated with knee OA so people can get up and moving.  Just walk or swim.  Your knees will thank you.



joint

 

This morning I had to fast for a doctor’s appointment – water only for 12 hours.  The hardest part was not having coffee.  So directly after my blood was drawn I went to my friend’s deli.  Large black coffee and a bacon, egg, and cheese on a roll with salt, pepper, and ketchup in case you’re wondering.

Thomas is one of the deli owners and I’ve known him for years.  He took my order and called it into the kitchen.  The breakfast rush was over and lunch was still a couple hours away so we had a few minutes to catch up.

Tom was limping and wearing a basic knee sleeve.  He explained that he had been fishing all weekend and spent a couple days in moderate swells being bounced around on a friend’s boat.  The end result was a stiff knee and a noticeable limp.  There wasn’t any trauma just regular wear and tear.  Thomas in his in his late forties and spends most of the day on his feet, so a bad knee is a bit more than an inconvenience.

Tom has a family and didn’t have time to rest after his fishing trip.  He went directly from the boat to his fatherly duties, and then went to bed.  He woke up and then went directly to work.  Tom knew nothing about RICE.  RICE stands for Rest, ice, compression, and elevation.  RICE is good for knee pain caused by arthritis or a minor injury.

I explained RICE to Tom.  He said he hopes his schedule will allow him to try it.

Good luck Tom.  My fear is that if you don’t find the time, your knee will find it for you.

Now there’s a time to rest and a time to exercise.  Listen to your body.  It will usually let you know when it’s time for what.



This blog is all about osteoarthritis.  We don’t spend much time with Rheumatoid, but this is really interesting and worth a look.

Article from John Greenwald – Medical Press

sun-big-solar-flare-100910-02

 

What began as a chat between husband and wife has evolved into an intriguing scientific discovery. The results, published in May in BMJ (formerly British Medical Journal) Open, show a “highly significant” correlation between periodic solar storms and incidences of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and giant cell arteritis (GCA), two potentially debilitating autoimmune diseases. The findings by a rare collaboration of physicists and medical researchers suggest a relationship between the solar outbursts and the incidence of these diseases that could lead to preventive measures if a causal link can be established.

RA and GCA are autoimmune conditions in which the body mistakenly attacks its own organs and tissues. RA inflames and swells joints and can cause crippling damage if left untreated. In GCA, the autoimmune disease results in inflammation of the wall of arteries, leading to headaches, jaw pain, vision problems and even blindness in severe cases.

Inspiring this study were conversations between Simon Wing, a Johns Hopkins University physicist and first author of the paper, and his wife, Lisa Rider, deputy unit chief of the Environmental Autoimmunity Group at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in the National Institutes of Health, and a coauthor. Rider spotted data from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, showing that cases of RA and GCA followed close to 10-year cycles. “That got me curious,” Wing recalled. “Only a few things in nature have a periodicity of about 10-11 years and the solar cycle is one of them.”

“More than a coincidental connection”

Wing teamed with physicist Jay Johnson of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, a long-time collaborator, to investigate further. When the physicists tracked the incidence of RA and GCA cases compiled by Mayo Clinic researchers, the results suggested “more than a coincidental connection,” said Eric Matteson, chair of the division of rheumatology at the Mayo Clinic, and a coauthor. This work drew upon previous space physics research supported by the DOE Office of Science.

The findings found increased incidents of RA and GCA to be in periodic concert with the cycle of magnetic activity of the sun. During the solar cycle, dramatic changes that can affect space weather near Earth take place in the sun. At the solar maximum, for example, an increased number of outbursts called coronal mass ejections hurl millions of tons of magnetic and electrically charged plasma gas against the Earth’s magnetosphere, the magnetic field that surrounds the planet. This contact whips up geomagnetic disturbances that can disrupt cell phone service, damage satellites and knock out power grids. More importantly, during the declining phase of the solar maximum high-speed streams develop in the solar wind that is made up of plasma that flows from the sun. These streams continuously buffet Earth’s magnetosphere, producing enhanced geomagnetic activity at high Earth latitudes.

The research, which tracked correlations of the diseases with both geomagnetic activity and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar radiation, focused on cases recorded in Olmsted County, Minnesota, the home of the Mayo Clinic, over more than five decades. The physicists compared the data with indices of EUV radiation for the years 1950 through 2007 and indices of geomagnetic activity from 1966 through 2007. Included were all 207 cases of GCA and all 1,179 cases of RA occurring in Olmsted County during the periods and collected in a long-term study led by Sherine Gabriel, then of the Mayo Clinic and now dean of the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

Correlations proved to be strongest between the diseases and geomagnetic activity. GCA incidence—defined as the number of new cases per capita per year in the county—regularly peaked within one year of the most intense geomagnetic activity, while RA incidence fell to a minimum within one year of the least intense activity. Correlations with the EUV indices were seen to be less robust and showed a significantly longer response time.

Consistent with previous studies

The findings were consistent with previous studies of the geographic distribution of RA cases in the United States. Such research found a greater incidence of the disease in sections of the country that are more likely to be affected by geomagnetic activity. For example, the heaviest incidence lay along geographic latitudes on the East Coast that were below those on the West Coast. This asymmetry may reflect the fact that high geomagnetic latitudes—areas most subject to geomagnetic activity—swing lower on the East Coast than on the opposite side of the country. While Washington, D.C., lies just 1 degree farther north than San Francisco geographically, for example, the U.S. capital is 7 degrees farther north in terms of geomagnetic latitude.

Although the authors make no claim to a causal explanation for their findings, they identify five characteristics of the disease occurrence that are not obviously explained by any of the currently leading hypotheses. These include the east-west asymmetries of the RA and GCA outbreaks and the periodicities of the incidences in concert with the . Among the possible causal pathways the authors consider are reduced production of the hormone melatonin, an anti-inflammatory mediator with immune-enhancing effects, and increased formation of free radicals in susceptible individuals. A study of 142 electrical power workers found that excretion of melatonin—a proxy used to estimate production of the hormone—was reduced by 21 percent on days with increased geomagnetic activity.

Confirming a causal link between outbreaks of RA and GCA and geomagnetic activity would be an important step towards developing strategies for mitigating the impact of the activity on susceptible individuals. These strategies could include relocating to lower latitudes and developing methods to counteract direct causal agents that may be controlled by geomagnetic activity. For now, say the authors, their findings warrant further investigations covering longer time periods, additional locations and other .



We were asked to post some studies about magnetic therapy

 patient education

 Effects of static magnets on chronic knee pain and physical function: a double-blind study.

Hinman MR, Ford J, Heyl H.

Department of Physical Therapy, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, USA.

CONTEXT: Static magnets have become an increasingly popular alternative therapy for individuals with musculoskeletal pain despite limited scientific evidence to support their efficacy or safety.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of static magnets on the pain and functional limitations associated with chronic knee pain due to degenerative joint disease.

DESIGN: Double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

SETTING: Pretests and posttests were conducted in an academic health science center.

PARTICIPANTS: Forty-three ambulatory subjects with chronic pain in 1 or both knee joints who were recruited from outpatient clinics or who volunteered to participate.

INTERVENTION: Subjects wore pads containing magnets or placebos over their painful knee joints for 2 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-administered ratings of pain and physical function using the Western Ontario and Mc Master Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and a timed 15-m (50-ft) walk.

RESULTS: Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed significantly greater improvements in the group wearing magnets (P=.002). Univariate analyses indicated that comparative changes in self-rated pain and physical function (P=.002 and .001, respectively) were greater than changes in gait speed (P=.042).

CONCLUSIONS: The application of static magnets over painful knee joints appears to reduce pain and enhance functional movement. However, further study is needed to determine the physiological mechanisms responsible for this analgesic effect.

Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. 2002 Jul-Aug;8(4):50-5.

Information about magnetic therapy knee brace.



We were asked to post some studies about magnetic therapy

Joint Pain

Joint Pain

Effect of magnetic knee wrap on quadriceps strength in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

Chen CY, Chen CL, Hsu SC, Chou SW, Wang KC. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of magnetic knee wrap on isokinetic quadriceps strength in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis (OA).

DESIGN: Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled and before-after trial.

SETTING: Rehabilitation clinic in a tertiary hospital.

PARTICIPANTS: Eligible patients (N=50) (mean age+/-SD, 66.0+/-8.6 y) with mild to moderate knee OA were recruited from the outpatient department and 37 (74%) completed the trial. Only 3 (6%) withdrew due to study-related adverse effects.

INTERVENTIONS: Wearing the active (n=24) or sham (n=26) magnetic knee wrap for 12 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was isokinetic quadriceps strength. Secondary outcome measures included the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) Pain Scale.

RESULTS: Using intention-to-treat analyses, the peak isokinetic quadriceps strength increased significantly in the treated leg at 30 degrees/s (P=.007) and 60 degrees/s (P=.022) after wearing the magnetic knee wrap. Compared with baseline, the median strength increase for the treated leg in the study group significantly exceeded that in the control group at week 4 (.05 Nm/kg vs -.09 Nm/kg at 60 degrees/s, P=.038) and week 12 (30 degrees/s, .09 Nm/kg vs .04 Nm/kg, P=.044; 60 degrees/s, .17 Nm/kg vs .02 Nm/kg, P=.031). The HAQ-DI and HAQ Pain Scales improved significantly in both groups. Compared with baseline, the improvement at week 12 in terms of the HAQ-DI in the study group significantly exceeded that in the control group.

CONCLUSIONS: Magnetic knee wrap may significantly facilitate isokinetic quadriceps strength in patients with mild to moderate knee OA (osteoarthritis).

Chen CY, Chen CL, Hsu SC, Chou SW, Wang KC (Dec 2008). “Effect of magnetic knee wrap on quadriceps strength in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 89(12):2258-64. PMID: 18976982

Information about magnetic therapy knee brace.



We were asked to post some studies about magnetic therapyHere you go.

magnetic therapy

magnetic therapy

Double-blind placebo-controlled trial of static magnets for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: results of a pilot study.

Wolsko PM, Eisenberg DM, Simon LS, Davis RB, Walleczek J, Mayo-Smith M, Kaptchuk TJ, Phillips RS. Division for Research and Education, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

CONTEXT: Outpatient clinical studies of magnet therapy, a complementary therapy commonly used to treat osteoarthritis (OA), have been limited by the absence of a credible placebo control.

OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess the feasibility and promise of studying static magnetic therapy for knee OA and determine the ability of a new placebo-magnet device to provide concealment of group assignment.

DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

SETTING: Academic teaching hospital in Boston. PARTICIPANTS: We enrolled 29 subjects with idiopathic or post-traumatic OA of the knee.

INTERVENTIONS: Subjects received either high-strength magnetic (active) or placebo-magnetic (placebo) knee sleeve treatment for 4 hours in a monitored setting and self-treatment 6 hours daily for 6 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Primary outcomes were change in knee pain as measured by the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index Pain Subscale at 6 weeks and extent of group concealment at study end.

RESULTS: At 4 hours, VAS pain scores (+/- SE) on a 5-item scale (0-500, 500 worst) decreased 79 +/- 18 mm in the active group and 10 +/- 21 mm in the placebo group (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in any primary or secondary measure of efficacy between the treatment groups at 6 weeks. Despite widespread testing for magnetic properties, at study end, 69% of the active group and 77% of the placebo group (P > 0.2) believed that they had been assigned to the active treatment group.

CONCLUSION: Despite our small sample size, magnets showed statistically significant efficacy compared to placebo after 4 hours under rigorously controlled conditions. The sustained efficacy of magnetic therapy for knee osteoarthritis could be assessed in an adequately powered trial utilizing an appropriate control such our new placebo-magnet device.

Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):36-43. PMID: 15055092

Information about magnetic therapy knee brace.



OA Treatment Option

December 20, 2014
Knee Support
Knee Support

Maybe all you need is a simple knee sleeve.  A neoprene knee brace will provide warmth and compression, that will make an arthritic knee feel better.  An arthritis knee sleeve is a simple and inexpensive treatment option that may reduce the amount of medications you take, and get you up and moving.  Less knee pain is a good thing.

This Reinforced Knee Sleeve is constructed of neoprene with a 2-sided nylon outer covering.  This knee brace provides warmth, compression, and padding.  An additional oval pad in the font of the knee support offers additional protection and localized heat.  Contouring behind the knee makes this knee brace comfortable and low profile.

This knee brace is available on the Heritage Medical Equipment website for $18.95. Click this link to learn more.

 



Stride-OA-Knee-Brace

The Stride OA is a knee brace designed to relieve the knee pain caused by osteoarthritis.  What makes this knee brace an effective treatment option for OA is that it only has one hinge, and that hinge is always going to be on the outside of the leg.

The most popular unloading knee braces have one hinge, not two.  Two hinges make a knee brace bulky and uncomfortable.  Think about a metal bar rubbing the inside of your legs raw.  What makes the Stride OA unique is that the single hinge is always positioned on the outside of the leg.  This is important.  Most single hinge knee braces require that the hinge be positioned on the affected side of the knee.  This means the hinge goes on the side of knee where the knee pain is.  Since most people suffer from medial compartment OA (pain on the inside of the knee), most people receive unloading knee braces with hinges on the inside of their legs.  The Stride OA always, always, always has the hinge positioned on the outside of the leg.

So for the vast majority of people who suffer with knee osteoarthritis, the Stride OA is going to be a comfortable, and effective treatment option.  And for patients with arthritis in both of their knees the Stride OA may be their only option.  Think about trying to walk with two metal bars strapped on the inside of your knees banging against each other.

Easy-to-use buckles secure this brace to the leg.  The cuffs are durable yet conform easily to a variety of leg shapes.  That means the knee brace will provide pain relief and be comfortable.

Learn more about the Stride OA.