October 2016
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magnetic knee braces

Double-blind placebo-controlled trial of static magnets for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: results of a pilot study.

Wolsko PM, Eisenberg DM, Simon LS, Davis RB, Walleczek J, Mayo-Smith M, Kaptchuk TJ, Phillips RS. Division for Research and Education, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

CONTEXT: Outpatient clinical studies of magnet therapy, a complementary therapy commonly used to treat osteoarthritis (OA), have been limited by the absence of a credible placebo control.

OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess the feasibility and promise of studying static magnetic therapy for knee OA and determine the ability of a new placebo-magnet device to provide concealment of group assignment.

DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

SETTING: Academic teaching hospital in Boston. PARTICIPANTS: We enrolled 29 subjects with idiopathic or post-traumatic OA of the knee.

INTERVENTIONS: Subjects received either high-strength magnetic (active) or placebo-magnetic (placebo) knee sleeve treatment for 4 hours in a monitored setting and self-treatment 6 hours daily for 6 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Primary outcomes were change in knee pain as measured by the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index Pain Subscale at 6 weeks and extent of group concealment at study end.

RESULTS: At 4 hours, VAS pain scores (+/- SE) on a 5-item scale (0-500, 500 worst) decreased 79 +/- 18 mm in the active group and 10 +/- 21 mm in the placebo group (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in any primary or secondary measure of efficacy between the treatment groups at 6 weeks. Despite widespread testing for magnetic properties, at study end, 69% of the active group and 77% of the placebo group (P > 0.2) believed that they had been assigned to the active treatment group.

CONCLUSION: Despite our small sample size, magnets showed statistically significant efficacy compared to placebo after 4 hours under rigorously controlled conditions. The sustained efficacy of magnetic therapy for knee osteoarthritis could be assessed in an adequately powered trial utilizing an appropriate control such our new placebo-magnet device.

Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):36-43. PMID: 15055092

Learn more about magnetic knee supports.

magnetic knee sleeve

Effect of magnetic knee wrap on quadriceps strength in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

Chen CY, Chen CL, Hsu SC, Chou SW, Wang KC. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of magnetic knee wrap on isokinetic quadriceps strength in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis (OA).

DESIGN: Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled and before-after trial.

SETTING: Rehabilitation clinic in a tertiary hospital.

PARTICIPANTS: Eligible patients (N=50) (mean age+/-SD, 66.0+/-8.6 y) with mild to moderate knee OA were recruited from the outpatient department and 37 (74%) completed the trial. Only 3 (6%) withdrew due to study-related adverse effects.

INTERVENTIONS: Wearing the active (n=24) or sham (n=26) magnetic knee wrap for 12 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was isokinetic quadriceps strength. Secondary outcome measures included the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) Pain Scale.

RESULTS: Using intention-to-treat analyses, the peak isokinetic quadriceps strength increased significantly in the treated leg at 30 degrees/s (P=.007) and 60 degrees/s (P=.022) after wearing the magnetic knee wrap. Compared with baseline, the median strength increase for the treated leg in the study group significantly exceeded that in the control group at week 4 (.05 Nm/kg vs -.09 Nm/kg at 60 degrees/s, P=.038) and week 12 (30 degrees/s, .09 Nm/kg vs .04 Nm/kg, P=.044; 60 degrees/s, .17 Nm/kg vs .02 Nm/kg, P=.031). The HAQ-DI and HAQ Pain Scales improved significantly in both groups. Compared with baseline, the improvement at week 12 in terms of the HAQ-DI in the study group significantly exceeded that in the control group.

CONCLUSIONS: Magnetic knee wrap may significantly facilitate isokinetic quadriceps strength in patients with mild to moderate knee OA (osteoarthritis).

Chen CY, Chen CL, Hsu SC, Chou SW, Wang KC (Dec 2008). “Effect of magnetic knee wrap on quadriceps strength in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 89(12):2258-64. PMID: 18976982



Magnetic therapy has been used worldwide for centuries and is ideal for pain relief. Back pain, knee pain, arthritis, tendonitis, or even migraines can be helped with magnets.  Magnets are a safe, easy and effective method for achieving natural pain relief. In most cases, magnets are placed directly over the painful area.

Magnets can affect ion channels which can reduce and/or block nerve pain signals. Ions are electro-chemicals that have either a positive or negative charge. Their movement through cellular gateways, called ‘ion channels’, controls pain signals, muscle contraction, and nearly all other biological processes. Ion channels can be affected chemically with drugs, manually with electrical stimulation, and naturally with magnets.

Using magnets for pain relief offers a huge advantage, because they’re safe, non-invasive, they last a long time, and have no side effects. Research studies show that magnetic therapy can be used as often as needed.  When high quality magnets are properly applied, they can be effective up to 90% of the time.

Learn more about magnetic knee braces.

Learn more about magnetic back braces.

magnetic therapy

                  Magnetic Therapy

There are many skeptics of magnetic therapy. But magnet therapy has a growing number of people who swear that it works, and rely on it to live pain free lives.

Using magnets for pain relief has been around for a long time. Aristotle, the Greek philosopher talked about the healing property of magnets in 300 BC.  And the earliest recorded mention of the medical use of magnets was about 2000 BC.  The Yellow Emperor`s Classic of Internal Medicine is one of the earliest medical books ever written. The book discusses using magnets for pain relief as well as other modern treatment options.

It was discovered in the late 1700s that the body produces magnetic impulses. Many studies around this time led to the belief that placing magnets on an affected area of the body will help align these impulses and ease pain.

Learn more about magnetic knee braces.

Joint Pain

                        Joint Pain

Osteoarthritis of the knee is the mechanical breakdown of knee cartilage.  Where rheumatoid arthritis is the chemical breakdown of cartilage, osteoarthritis is damage caused by long-term wear and tear.

Years of use causes the cartilage in the knee joint to wear away. As the cartilage wears away, the joint space narrows, and eventually the bones begin to rub together.  That’s what causes the knee pain.

Stretching, knee braces, weight loss, and strengthening the muscles around the knee are all effective, conservative treatment options for reducing knee pain associated with knee osteoarthritis.




The CMC Arthritis Thumb Brace is an effective and light weight treatment option for basal joint (CMC) arthritis.  This thumb brace is fit by squeezing the embedded metal insert to snugly fit the hand around the thumb.  It can be worn during household activities and sports like tennis or golf.

This thumb brace is low-profile and durable.  It helps keep the skin cool and dry and is easily applied and removed.  It is comfortable and light weight.

Informative Video about this CMC Arthritis Thumb Brace.

How to measure for the CMC Arthritis Thumb Brace.


Walking is Good Exercise

                    Walking is Good Exercise


It may seem counterintuitive.  If your knee hurts as a result of osteoarthritis, walking may help your knee feel better.  My grandmother used to tell me, “if you don’t use it, you lose it”.  I still believe her, more so now that whenever I wake up something hurts.

Walking helps stretch your muscles, lubricate your knee joint, and helps you lose weight.  All three of these benefits help control knee pain.  Tight muscles put undue stress on your knee joint.  Keeping the fluids moving in and out of your knee helps keep your anatomy healthy, and losing weight decreases the pressure on your knee joint.

So don’t give up.  One step at a time.  Make yourself better.


These are the instructions on how to fit a knee brace indicated for osteoarthritis.  Learn more about this unloading knee brace:  New Option OA Knee Brace.



Remove the OA brace from the bag and align it over the affected knee as a point of reference.





Undo the top and bottom straps, open up the thigh closure and calf closure and remove the patella buttress to where the brace is now open.





Place the open brace behind the leg and center with the knee joint, making sure the hinge joint is even with the patella. While supporting the brace with one hand, use the other hand to affix the calf closure. Re‐adjust tightness as needed.





With the calf closure secured, affix the thigh closure. Again, re‐adjust tightness as needed.






The OA hinge should be aligned with the patella and should be opposite of the affected side. In this example, this is a left knee, medial OA patient.






Secure the lower strap in two phases. First, pull strap out and away. Then, to secure it, affix the strap to the velcro hook tab (see arrow) on the inside of the brace before you go through the D‐rings. Once adhered, now go through the D‐ring and secure.





Repeat the same procedure with the thigh strap. This will insure that the hinge arms are now engaged and that the 7 degree offset is pushing at the joint line to open the opposite knee joint. This two‐step phase of strapping at the calf and thigh is the key step in the OA brace offering relief.





Lastly, adhere the patella buttress by affixing the tabs on the hinge side first, pulling across, centering the patella within the buttress, the securing the other two tabs on the opposite side.




New Unloader Knee Brace

There’s a new version of an effective and reliable knee brace to treat unicompartmental osteoarthritis.  The New Options Sports Wrap-Around OA Knee Brace is now available.

This off-loading knee brace is indicated for mild to moderate levels of knee pain caused by OA.  This knee brace comes in a wrap-around design, meaning patients do not have to struggle pulling the knee brace up or down their legs.  The knee brace simply wraps around and fastens with Velcro closures.  The patella buttress is designed to address secondary patella tracking issues.

This is a low-profile knee brace with thigh and calf paddles to offer some mild unloading of the knee joint.   The paddles work in conjunction with “lock down” straps that provide counter force.

The pull-up version of this unloading knee brace has been used effectively for years.  The wrap-around version makes it easier for patients to use and wear.  If you are considering a knee brace to treat your knee pain associated with arthritis, this brace is worth learning about.

Learn more about the New Option OA Knee Brace

Workout Partners

Stretching is very important for an arthritic knee.  When you think knee osteoarthritis it’s easy to focus only on the knee joint.  However, the muscles surrounding the knee should not be forgotten.

The hamstrings and quadriceps play an important role in managing knee pain.  Tight muscles put unnecessary stain on arthritic knees.  By stretching you help keep the anatomy surrounding your knee healthy and limber.  Exercise is important.  Just walking will help keep your knee joint lubricated.  Healthy stretched muscles will help an arthritic knee move easier, facilitating that movement of fluid that’s so important to healthy knee joints.

The muscles, ligaments, bones, and cartilage all work together in the knee joint.  They need to work together as a team.  Stretching is a great way to reduce knee pain and facilitate a healthier lifestyle.